Meter read
# Days
Usage (kwh)
Billed
Estimated HVAC
cost
12-7-07
34
455
$50.62
$.62
1-7-08
33
875
$85.50
$35.50
2-5-08
29
1054
$93.21
$43.21
3-5-08
28
927
$85.29
$35.29
4-4-08
31
815
$73.80
$23.80
5-5-08
28
499
$56.08
$6.08
6-5-08
34
652
$66.48
$16.08
7-3-08
28
755
$78.10
$28.10
8-4-08
32
973
$95.75
$45.75
9-3-08
30
798
$82.31
$32.31
10-3-08
28
549
$63.23
$13.23
11-3-08
30
363
$48.92
$0
12-5-08
34
662
$71.90
$21.90
1-8-09
34
1064
$102.22
$52.22
2-6-09
29
1115
$105.98
$55.98
The "Estimated HVAC Cost" column is figured using the total bill and subtracting 50 dollars.  The 50 dollar
figure comes from low heating and cooling load spring and fall months where the 13.7 SEER heat pump
HVAC system runs very little.  This, of course, is just an estimate.  The total for the first 12 months in the
house was 305.07 dollars to heat and cool the house for the entire year.  The monthly average was $25.42.

The heating season house temperature is maintained at a constant 70 degrees F. This is comfortable with
a relatively constant humidity typically ranging from 45-55%.  A standard heat pump does not operate
efficiently if the thermostat set point varies, so the set point remains constant.  The cooling season
temperature was maintained at 74 degrees F.  Humidity is controlled year round with a small dehumidifier
with the set point at 55%.  No humidification is necessary during the winter because air leaks are minimal,
reducing the drying effect most houses have during cold weather.  The humidity in the house has a fairly
narrow range of about 40-55% year round.  

To this date the emergency coils have never had to kick in.  Even at -6 degrees this winter, the heat pump
was able to keep up, although at this temperature the heat pump efficiency would barely be 100%, meaning
the coils would not have cost much more to provide the same amount of heat.  The coils operate at near
100%, a decent heat pump operates above 100% down to about 8 below.

February 2008 and January 2009 had nearly identical electric usage measured by the kilowatt hours used,
kwh.  The cost per kwh raised from .0884 to .0961 evidently due to a rate change in 2008 of approximately
9%.

It looks like Duke is going to raise them again to pay for the plant going up in Edwardsport.  The Evansville
Courier and Press wrote: "
Evidence presented by Duke Energy Indiana estimates that rate payers will see
an overall increase in rates of approximately
16%.  In addition, DEI will have to justify and seek approval in
a separate proceeding to recover any costs above the approved $1.985 billion.
"

Looks like we all need to reevaluate our energy budget.
    Duke Energy Electric Bill Information
Columns are information from bill provided by Duke Energy